Who is my neighbor – Joyce Vincent story and another story similar to that in Nigeria – Don’t Quit on People

Who is my neighbor - Joyce Vincent story and another story similar to that in Nigeria

#neighbor #neighbors #neighborhood #joycevincent #truestory #neighbour #messageofthekingdom #kingdomofGod #Godskingdom #yourkingdom #kingdomofheaven #don’tQuit #people #perfectstories #thegoodSamaritan

Saturday, 23rd of July 2022

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Perfect stories – Who is my neighbor – Joyce Vincent story and another story similar to that in Nigeria – Don’t Quit on People

Who is my neighbor - Joyce Vincent story and another story similar to that in Nigeria

Hello Friends, following our post concerning late Joyce Vincent who passed on undiscovered for close to two years which was shared two days ago, if you missed that, follow this link on Wikipedia below

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joyce_Vincent

Full details below:

Joyce Carol Vincent (19 October 1965 – December 2003) was an English woman whose death went unnoticed for more than two years as her corpse lay undiscovered at her bedsit in north London. Prior to her death, she had cut off nearly all contact with those who knew her. She resigned from her job in 2001, and moved into a shelter for victims of domestic abuse. Around the same time, she began to reduce contact with friends and family. She died sometime in December 2003. Her remains were discovered on 25 January 2006, with the cause of death believed to be either an asthma attack or complications from a recent peptic ulcer.
Joyce Vincent
JoyceVincentStudioPhoto.jpg
Studio photograph of Vincent
Born
Joyce Carol Vincent

19 October 1965

London, England
Died  (aged 38)
London, England
Body discovered 25 January 2006

Vincent’s life and death were the topic of Dreams of a Life, a 2011 docudrama film. The film and Vincent’s life inspired musician Steven Wilson‘s album Hand. Cannot. Erase..

Life

Joyce Vincent was born in London’s Hammersmith area on 19 October 1965 and raised near Fulham Palace Road.[1] Her parents had emigrated to London from Grenada; she was of Dougla descent. Her father, Lawrence, was a carpenter of African descent and her mother, Lyris, was of Indian descent.[1] Following an operation, her mother died when Vincent was 11, and her four older sisters took responsibility for her upbringing.[1][2] She had a strained relationship with her emotionally distant father, who she claimed had died in 2001 (he actually died in 2004, unaware that Vincent had predeceased him).[3][4] She attended Melcombe Primary School and Fulham Gilliatt School for Girls, and left school at age sixteen with no qualifications.[5] She had a wide circle of friends in the music industry and when she was 25, she attended and was video recorded in the backstage audience at the 1990 Wembley Concert, ‘Nelson Mandela, International Tribute For a Free South Africa.’ (BFI National Archive) Reportedly, she met Mandela at the concert and shook his hand.[1][5]In 1985, Vincent began working as a secretary at OCL in the City of London.[1] She later worked at C.Itoh and Law Debenture before joining Ernst & Young.[2] She worked at Ernst & Young for four years in the treasury department, but resigned in March 2001 for unknown reasons.[1] Shortly afterwards, Vincent spent some time in a domestic abuse shelter in Haringey and worked as a cleaner in a budget hotel.[1] During this period, she became estranged from her family.[6] A source involved in the investigation said: “She detached herself from her family but there was no bust up. They are a really nice family. We understand she was in a relationship and there was a history of domestic violence.”[7] It has been speculated that she was either ashamed to be a victim of domestic abuse or did not want to be found by her abuser.[8]In February 2003, Vincent was moved into the bedsit flat above Wood Green Shopping City[9] where she later died. The flat was owned by the Metropolitan Housing Trust and was used to house victims of abuse.[10] In November 2003, after vomiting blood, she was hospitalised at North Middlesex Hospital for two days, due to a peptic ulcer.[11]

Death

Vincent lived above the Shopping City in Wood Green in North London in a Housing Trust flat. The cause of her death is unknown, as is the date, though it is speculated to be around December 2003. She suffered from asthma and had a peptic ulcer at the time of her death, so some have suggested an asthma attack or complications surrounding her recent peptic ulcer as a possible cause of death. Her remains were described as “mostly skeletal” according to the pathologist, and she was lying on her back, next to a shopping bag, surrounded by Christmas presents she had wrapped but never delivered.[6] It is not known to whom the presents were addressed.[12] The refrigerator in her bedsit contained food with 2003 expiry date labels.Neighbours had assumed the flat was unoccupied, and the odour of decomposing body tissue was attributed to nearby waste bins.[10] The flat’s windows did not allow direct sight to the inside.[13] It was a noisy building which may explain why no one questioned the constant noise from the television, which remained turned on until she was discovered.[10] Half of her rent was being automatically paid to Metropolitan Housing Trust by benefits agencies, leading officials to believe that she was still alive.[6] With over two years’ worth of unpaid rent totalling £2,400 that had accrued, housing officials decided to repossess the property.[6] Her corpse was discovered on 25 January 2006 when bailiffs had forced entry into the flat.[10] The television and heating were still running due to debt forgiveness and her bills being continually paid through automatic debit.[14][15]The Metropolitan Housing Trust said that due to housing benefits covering the costs of rent for some period after Vincent’s death, arrears had not been realised until much later.[2] The Trust also said that no concerns were raised by neighbours or visitors at any time during the two years between her death and discovery of the body.[2]Vincent’s remains were too badly decomposed to conduct a full post-mortem, and she had to be identified through dental records.[10] Police ruled death by natural causes as there was nothing to suggest foul play. The front door was double locked and there was no sign of a break-in.[16] At the time of her death she had a boyfriend, but the police were unable to locate him.[17] Her sisters had hired a private detective to look for her and contacted the Salvation Army, but these attempts proved unsuccessful.[4] The detective found the house where Vincent was living, and the family wrote letters to her, receiving no response as she was already dead by this time. As a result, the family concluded she had deliberately broken ties with them.[4][18]The Glasgow Herald reported,

“…her friends noted her as someone who fled at signs of trouble, who walked out of jobs if she clashed with a colleague, and who moved from one flat to the next all over London. She didn’t answer the phone to her sister and didn’t appear to have her own circle of friends, instead relying on the company of relative strangers who came with the package of a new boyfriend, a colleague, or flatmate.”[8]

In popular cultureEdit

Dreams of a LifeEdit

A film about Vincent, Dreams of a Life, written and directed by Carol Morley with Zawe Ashton playing Vincent, was released in 2011.[1] Morley tracked down and interviewed people who had known Vincent. They described a beautiful, intelligent, socially active woman, “upwardly mobile” and “a high flyer”, who they assumed “was off somewhere having a better life than they were”.[1] During her life, she met figures such as Nelson MandelaBen E. KingGil Scott-Heron, and Betty Wright, spoke on the telephone with Isaac Hayes and had also been to dinner with Stevie Wonder.[1][19]

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Steven Wilson album

On 4 November 2014, English musician Steven Wilson announced that his fourth CD release, titled Hand. Cannot. Erase., would be based on the life of Vincent.[20] According to Wilson, he was inspired to create a concept album after seeing Dreams of a Life.[21] From the book that accompanied the deluxe release of the album it is clear that the central character, ‘H.’, is a highly fictionalised version of Vincent: she is born on 8 October 1978 to an Italian mother and dies or disappears on 22 December 2014. Her only sister is a girl, ‘J.’, who was briefly fostered by her parents prior to their divorce. In the album and book the Christmas presents are intended for H.’s estranged brother and his family.[22]

Continuation:

In response to that post, we received a message from one of our missionary friend down here in Nigeria on our broadcast list.

Just to let us know that this is not restricted to UK alone where people mind their business and might not engage with you despite length of stay as neighbors..

Read his true story.

We have taken out the names of the city..but this happened in Nigeria..

I have a friend and brother that we lost touch for over six years now. He was not picking his calls. I decided go look for him in state.

Getting to the state, I told a missionary colleague who graciously agreed to take me to the estate where he stays. As we drove round the estate trying to trace the place, I was calling his son in another city who was giving me description on how to locate there. He himself cannot recollect the number of his fathers house. The father had left them years ago and moved over to this state.

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Finally, I got the place. I remembered the brother had taken me there many years ago. I knocked and knocked. No response. A car was parked inside the compound. The gate was shut with a padlock. I was tired. I left. Up till today, I don’t know his state. Just praying for God to show mercy.

This was a pastor, a retired bank executive in an apex bank, someone who had accompanied me to the mission fields in Ghana and Togo, and even Brazil for a publishing conference – totally cutting off. Very strange.

Continuation of my point on who is my neighbor

Long and short of the story is for us christians to be our neighbors (neighbours) keeper…let’s reach out to each other and if someone is out of touch, continue to pray so that God will remove the Vail..

What is The message of the kingdom?

The message of the kingdom is a practically driven love affair between us and God and us and others …never lose sight of that..

It is a practically driven love affairs ..there is nothing like loving people, whom God created in *theory* and this people don’t need to be people within your circle..the story of the good Samaritan in Luke 10:25-33 proves this.
read it here in message version for meditation and CONTEMPLATION

Luke 10:25-37

The Message Defining “Neighbor”

25 Just then a religion scholar stood up with a question to test Jesus. “Teacher, what do I need to do to get eternal life?”

26 He answered, “What’s written in God’s Law? How do you interpret it?”

27 He said, “That you love the Lord your God with all your passion and prayer and muscle and intelligence—and that you love your neighbor as well as you do yourself.”

28 “Good answer!” said Jesus. “Do it and you’ll live.”

29 Looking for a loophole, he asked, “And just how would you define ‘neighbor’?”

30-32 Jesus answered by telling a story. “There was once a man traveling from Jerusalem to Jericho. On the way he was attacked by robbers. They took his clothes, beat him up, and went off leaving him half-dead. Luckily, a priest was on his way down the same road, but when he saw him he angled across to the other side. Then a Levite religious man showed up; he also avoided the injured man.

33-35 “A Samaritan traveling the road came on him. When he saw the man’s condition, his heart went out to him. He gave him first aid, disinfecting and bandaging his wounds. Then he lifted him onto his donkey, led him to an inn, and made him comfortable. In the morning he took out two silver coins and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take good care of him. If it costs any more, put it on my bill—I’ll pay you on my way back.’

36 “What do you think? Which of the three became a neighbor to the man attacked by robbers?”

37 “The one who treated him kindly,” the religion scholar responded.

Jesus said, “Go and do the same.”

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Shalom to you and God’s Blessings always as you do as led…love is practical

Ambassador Monday Ogwuojo Ogbe
God’s Eagle Ministries
Https://www.otakada.org

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