Have Questions, Find answers on Otakada.org - Top Questions About Assurance of Salvation with Biblical Answers

Have Questions, Find answers on Otakada.org – Top Questions About Assurance of Salvation with Biblical Answers

Have Questions, Find answers on Otakada.org - Top Questions About Assurance of Salvation with Biblical Answers
Have Questions, Find answers on Otakada.org – Top Questions About Assurance of Salvation with Biblical Answers

Questions About Salvation: The 100 Most Frequently Asked Questions About Salvation –

Have Questions, Find Answers on Otakada.orgAssurance of Salvation – Daily, people turn to the Internet to find answers to their questions about spiritual matters. Topics related to spirituality are the second-most searched subjects online. Sadly, websites that present false teachings far outnumber those that proclaim the truth of God’s Word. We will provide answers as the Holy Spirit leads us from a biblical perspective. You will also need to pray to secure answers to any question you may have because one of the ministry of the Holy Spirit is to lead us into all truth – John 16:13. Today, we look at Questions About Assurance of Salvation and questions that relate to this with biblical answers.. Enjoy

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Contents

How can I have assurance of my salvation? Is eternal security biblical?
Can a Christian lose salvation?
Once saved always saved?

What if I don’t feel saved?
Is it possible for a person’s name to be erased from the Book of Life?

If our salvation is eternally secure, why does the Bible warn so strongly against apostasy?

Can a Christian “give back” salvation?
If you doubt your salvation, does that mean you are not truly saved?

Question: How can I have assurance of my salvation?

Answer: Many followers of Jesus Christ look for the assurance of salvation in the wrong places. We tend to seek assurance of salvation in the work God is doing in our lives, in our spiritual growth, and in the good works and obedience to God’s Word that is evident in our Christian walk. While these can be evidence of salvation, they are not things on which we should base the assurance of our salvation. Rather, we should find the assurance of our salvation in the objective truth of God’s Word. We should have confident trust that we are saved based on the promises God has declared, not because of our subjective experiences.

How can you have assurance of salvation? Consider 1 John 5:11-13: “And this is the testimony: God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life.” Who is it that has the Son? It is those who have believed in Him (John 1:12). If you have Jesus, you have life. Not temporary life, but eternal.

God wants us to have assurance of our salvation. We should not live our Christian lives wondering and worrying each day whether or not we are truly

saved. That is why the Bible makes the plan of salvation so clear: believe in Jesus Christ (John 3:16; Acts 16:31). “If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved” (Romans 10:9). Do you believe that Jesus died to pay the penalty for your sins (Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 5:21)? Do you trust Him alone for salvation? If your answer to these questions is “yes,” you are saved! Assurance means freedom from doubt. By taking God’s Word to heart, you can have no doubt about the reality of your eternal salvation.

Jesus Himself assures those who believe in Him: “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand” (John 10:28-29). Eternal life is just that—eternal. There is no one, not even yourself, who can take Christ’s God-given gift of salvation away from you.

We hide God’s Word in our hearts so that we do not sin against Him (Psalm 119:11). Take joy in what God’s Word is saying to you: instead of doubting, we can live with confidence! We can have the assurance from Christ’s own Word that our salvation will never be in question. Our assurance of salvation is based on the perfect and complete salvation God has provided for us through Jesus Christ.

Question: Is eternal security biblical?

Answer: When people come to know Christ as their Savior, they are brought into a relationship with God that guarantees their eternal security. Jude 24 declares, “To Him who is able to keep you from falling and to present you before his glorious presence without fault and with great joy.” God’s power is able to keep the believer from falling. It is up to Him, not us, to present us before His glorious presence. Our eternal security is a result of God’s keeping us, not our maintaining our own salvation.

The Lord Jesus Christ proclaimed, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand” (John 10:28-29b). Both Jesus and the Father have us firmly grasped in their hand. Who could possibly separate us from the grip of both the Father and the Son?

Ephesians 4:30 tells us that believers are “sealed for the day of redemption.” If believers did not have eternal security, the sealing could not truly be unto the day of redemption, but only to the day of sinning, apostasy, or disbelief.

John 3:15-16 tells us that whoever believes in Jesus Christ will “have eternal life.” If a person were to be promised eternal life, but then have it taken away, it was never “eternal” to begin with. If eternal security is not true, the promises of eternal life in the Bible would be in error.

The most powerful argument for eternal security is Romans 8:38-39, “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Our eternal security is based on God’s love for those whom He has redeemed. Our eternal security is purchased by Christ, promised by the Father, and sealed by the Holy Spirit.

Question: Can a Christian lose salvation?

Answer: Before this question is answered, the term Christian must be defined. A “Christian” is not just a person who has said a prayer or has walked down an aisle or has been raised in a Christian family. While each of these things can be a part of the Christian experience, they are not what “makes” a Christian. A Christian is a person who has, by faith, received and fully trusted in Jesus Christ as the only Savior (John 3:16; Acts 16:31; Ephesians 2:8-9).

So, with this definition in mind, can a Christian lose salvation? Perhaps the best way to answer this crucially important question is to examine how the Bible describes a Christian and to study what losing salvation would therefore entail. Here are a few examples:

A Christian is a new creation. “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has gone, the new has come!” (2 Corinthians 5:17). This verse speaks of a person becoming an entirely new creature as a result of being “in Christ.” For a Christian to lose salvation, the new creation would have to be canceled and reversed.

A Christian is redeemed. “For you know that it was not with perishable things such as silver or gold that you were redeemed from the empty way of life handed down to you from your forefathers, but with the precious blood of Christ, a lamb without blemish or defect” (1 Peter 1:18-19). The word redeemed refers to a purchase being made, a price being paid. For a Christian to lose salvation, God Himself would have to revoke His purchase that He paid for with the blood of Christ.

A Christian is justified. “Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 5:1). To “justify” means to “declare righteous.” All those who receive Jesus as Savior are

“declared righteous” by God. For a Christian to lose salvation, God would have to go back on His Word and “un-declare” what He had previously declared.

A Christian is promised eternal life. “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16). Eternal life is a promise of eternity (forever) in heaven with God. God promises, “Believe and you will have eternal life.” For a Christian to lose salvation, eternal life would have to be taken away. If a Christian is promised eternal life but then loses it, then the life was never “eternal” to begin with.

A Christian is guaranteed glorification. “And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified” (Romans 8:30). As we learned in Romans 5:1, God declares us justified at the moment of faith. According to Romans 8:30, glorification is guaranteed to all those whom God justifies. Glorification refers to the time when Christians will receive a perfect, resurrected body in heaven. If a Christian can lose salvation, then Romans 8:30 is in error, because God could not guarantee glorification for all those whom He predestines, calls, and justifies.

Even these few descriptions make it abundantly clear that a Christian cannot lose salvation. Most, if not all, of what the Bible says happens to us when we receive Jesus Christ as Savior would be invalidated if salvation could be lost. Salvation cannot be reversed. A Christian cannot be un-newly created or un-born again. Redemption cannot be undone. Eternal life cannot be lost and still be considered eternal. If a Christian can lose salvation, God would have to go back on His word and change His mind—two things Scripture tells us He never does.

The most frequent objections to the belief that a Christian cannot lose salvation are 1) What about those who are Christians and continually live an immoral lifestyle? and 2) What about those who are Christians but later reject the faith and deny Christ?

The problem with these two objections is the phrase “who are Christians.” The Bible declares that a true Christian will not live a continually immoral lifestyle (1 John 3:6). The Bible declares that anyone who departs the faith is demonstrating that he never truly was a Christian (1 John 2:19). Therefore, neither objection is valid. Christians do not continually live immoral lifestyles, nor do they reject the faith and deny Christ. Such actions are proof that they were never redeemed.

No, a Christian cannot lose salvation. Nothing can separate a Christian from God’s love (Romans 8:38-39). Nothing can remove a Christian from God’s hand (John 10:28-29). God is both willing and able to guarantee and maintain the

salvation He has given us. “To Him who is able to keep you from falling and to present you before his glorious presence without fault and with great joy—to the only God our Savior be glory, majesty, power and authority, through Jesus Christ our Lord, before all ages, now and forevermore! Amen” (Jude 24-25).

Question: Once saved always saved?

Answer: When people come to know Christ as their Savior, they are brought into a relationship with God that guarantees their salvation as eternally secure. Numerous passages of Scripture emphasize this fact.

Romans 8:30 declares, “And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified.” This verse tells us that from the moment God chooses us, it is already as if we are glorified in His presence in heaven. There is nothing that can prevent a believer from one day being glorified because God has already purposed it in heaven. Once a person is justified, his salvation is guaranteed—he is as secure as if he is already glorified in heaven.

Paul asks two crucial questions in Romans 8:33-34: “Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen? It is God who justifies. Who is he that condemns? Christ Jesus, who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.” Who will bring a charge against God’s elect? No one will, because Christ is our advocate. Who will condemn us? No one will, because Christ, the One who died for us, is the one who condemns. We have both the advocate and the judge as our Savior.

Believers are born again (regenerated) when they believe (John 3:3; Titus 3:5). For a Christian to lose his salvation, he would have to be un­ regenerated. The Bible gives no evidence that the new birth can be taken away.

The Holy Spirit indwells all believers (John 14:17; Romans 8:9) and baptizes all believers into the body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:13). For a believer to become unsaved, he would have to be “un-indwelt” and detached from the body of Christ.

John 3:15 states that whoever believes in Jesus Christ will “have eternal life.” If you believe in Christ today and have eternal life, but lose it tomorrow, then it was never eternal at all. Hence, if you lose your salvation, the promises of eternal life in the Bible would be in error.

For the most conclusive argument, Scripture says it best: “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:38-39).

Remember, the same God who saved you is the same God who will keep you. Once we are saved, we are always saved. Our salvation is eternally secure!

Question: What if I don’t feel saved?

Answer: This is an all-too-common question among Christians. Many people doubt their salvation because of their feelings, or the lack thereof. The Bible has much to say about salvation, but nothing to say about “feeling saved.” In one sense, salvation is a process by which the sinner is delivered from “wrath,” that is, from God’s judgment against sin (Romans 5:9; 1 Thessalonians 5:9). Specifically, it was Jesus’ death on the cross and subsequent resurrection that achieved our salvation (Romans 5:10; Ephesians 1:7).

Our part in the salvation process is to believe. First, we must hear the gospel— the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection (Ephesians 1:13). Then we must believe—trust in the Lord Jesus (Romans 1:16) and His sacrifice alone. We have no confidence in works of the flesh to achieve salvation. This faith involves a change of mind about sin and Christ (repentance, as in Acts 3:19) and a calling on the name of the Lord (Romans 10:9-10, 13). Salvation results in a changed life as we begin to live as a new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17).

We live in a feelings-oriented society, and, sadly, that emphasis on feelings has spilled over into the church. But feelings are unreliable. Emotions are untrustworthy. They ebb and flow like the tides of the sea. When emotions rule our lives, the simplest circumstances—a headache, a cloudy day, a word thoughtlessly spoken by a friend—can erode our confidence and send us “out to sea” in a fit of despair. Doubt and discouragement, particularly about the Christian life, are the inevitable result of trying to interpret our feelings as though they are truth.

The Christian who is well armed is not governed by feelings. Instead, he is governed by the truth he knows. Those who are continually questioning their relationship with God become preoccupied with themselves, constantly analyzing their own feelings. “Do I really love God?” “Does He really love me?” “Am I good enough?” What we really need to do is stop concentrating on our feelings and redirect our focus to God and the truth we know about Him from His Word.

We must not be controlled by subjective feelings but by objective truth. Objective truth centers on the great doctrines of the faith and their relevance to life: the sovereignty of God, the high-priestly intercession of Christ, the promise of the Holy Spirit, and the hope of eternal glory. Understanding these great truths, focusing on them, and meditating on them will enable us to reason from truth in all of life’s trials, and our faith will be strong and vital. Reasoning from what we feel about ourselves—rather than what we know about God—is a sure path to spiritual defeat.

God promised to save us if we come to Him in faith. He never promised that we will always feel saved.

Question: Is it possible for a person’s name to be erased from the Book of Life?

Answer: Revelation 22:19 says, “And if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part from the Book of Life, from the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book” (NKJV). This verse is involved in a perennial debate concerning eternal security. Does Revelation 22:19 mean that, after a person’s name is written in the Lamb’s Book of Life, it can be erased at some time in the future? In other words, can a Christian lose his salvation?

First, Scripture is clear that a true believer is kept secure by the power of God, sealed for the day of redemption (Ephesians 4:30), and the Son will lose none of those whom the Father has given to Him (John 6:39). The Lord Jesus Christ proclaimed, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand” (John 10:28-29). Salvation is God’s work, not ours (Titus 3:5), and it is His power that keeps us.

If the “anyone” referred to in Revelation 22:19 is not a believer, who is it? In other words, who might want to either add to or take away from the words of the Bible? Most likely, this tampering with God’s Word would be done not by true believers but by those who only profess to be Christians and who suppose that their names are in the Book of Life. Generally speaking, the two main groups who have traditionally tampered with the Revelation are pseudo-Christian cults and those who hold to very liberal theological beliefs. Many cults claim the name of Christ as their own, but they are not born again—the definitive biblical term for a Christian. Many theological liberals, such as those involved in the Jesus Seminar, have rejected outright the Word of God, giving evidence of their true spiritual nature.

The Bible cites several examples of those who thought they were believers but whose profession was proven to be false. In John 15, Jesus refers to them as branches that did not remain in the true Vine and therefore did not produce any fruit (cf. Matthew 7:16, 20). True disciples will exhibit the fruit of the Holy Spirit who resides within them (Galatians 5:22-23). In 2 Peter 2:22, false professors are dogs returning to their own vomit and sows that return to the mud after they’ve been washed. The barren branch, the dog, and the pig are all symbols of those who profess to have salvation but who have nothing more than their own righteousness to rely upon—not the righteousness of Christ, which truly saves.

It is doubtful that those who have repented of their sin and been born again would willingly tamper with God’s Word in this way—adding to it or taking from it. Of course, we recognize that Christians have sincerely held differences in the area of textual criticism. But cultists and liberals have demonstrably done both “adding to” and “taking away from.” Thus, we can understand God’s warning in Revelation 22:19 in this manner: anyone who tampers with this crucial message will find that God did not place his name in the Book of Life, will be denied access to the Holy City, and will forfeit any expectation of all the good things He promises to His saints in this book.

From a purely logical standpoint, why would the sovereign and omniscient God—He who knows the end from the beginning (Isaiah 46:10)—write a name in the Book of Life when He knows He will only have to erase it when that person eventually apostatizes and denies the faith? Additionally, reading this warning within the context of the paragraph in which it appears (Revelation 22:6-19) clearly shows that God remains consistent: only those who have taken heed of His warnings, repented, and been born again will have any good to look forward to in eternity. All others, sadly, have a terrible and terrifying future awaiting them.

Revelation 3:5 is another verse that impacts this issue. “He who overcomes … I will never blot out his name from the book of life.” The “overcomer” mentioned in this letter to Sardis is the Christian. Compare this with 1 John 5:4: “Everyone born of God overcomes the world.” And verse 5: “Who is it that overcomes the world? Only he who believes that Jesus is the Son of God.” (See also 1 John 2:13.) All believers are “overcomers” in that they have been granted victory over the sin and unbelief of the world.

Never does Scripture say that God erases a believer’s name from the Book of Life; there is never even a warning that He is contemplating it! The wonderful promise of Revelation 3:5 is that Jesus will not erase one’s name. Speaking to

the “overcomers” (all those redeemed by the blood of the Lamb), Jesus gives His word that He will not delete their names. He affirms that, once a name is there, it is there forever. This is based on the faithfulness of God, which is confirmed throughout Scripture.

The promise of Revelation 3:5 is directed to believers, who are secure in their salvation. In contrast, the warning of Revelation 22:19 is directed to unbelievers who, rather than change their hearts toward God, attempt to change God’s Word to suit themselves.

Question: If our salvation is eternally secure, why does the Bible warn so strongly against apostasy?

Answer: The Bible teaches that everyone who is born again by the power of the Holy Spirit is saved forever. We receive the gift of eternal life (John 10:28), not temporary life. Someone who is born again (John 3:3) cannot be “unborn”; after being adopted into God’s family (Romans 8:15), we will not be kicked out. When God starts a work, He finishes it (Philippians 1:6), so the child of God— the believer in Jesus Christ—is eternally secure in his salvation.

However, the Bible also contains some strong warnings against apostasy. These warnings have led some to doubt the doctrine of eternal security. After all, if we cannot lose our salvation, why are we warned against falling away from the Lord? This is a good question. First, we must understand what is meant by “apostasy.”

An apostate is someone who abandons his religious faith. It is clear from the Bible that apostates are people who made professions of faith in Jesus Christ, but never genuinely received Him as Savior. They were pretend believers. Those who turn away from Christ never really trusted Him to begin with, as 1 John 2:19 says, “They went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us.” Those who apostatize are simply demonstrating that they are not true believers, and they never were.

The parable of the wheat and the tares (Matthew 13:24-30) provides a simple illustration of apostasy. In the same field were growing wheat and “false wheat” (tares or weeds). At first, the difference between the two types of plants was undetectable, but as time went on, the weeds were seen for what they were. In the same way, in any given church today, there may be true, born-again believers side by side with pretenders—those who enjoy the messages, the music, and the fellowship, but have never repented of their sins and accepted Christ by faith. To any human observer, the true believer and the pretender may look identical. Only

God can see the heart. Matthew 13:1-9 (the parable of the sower) is another illustration of apostasy in action.

The Bible’s warnings against apostasy exist because there are two types of religious people: believers and unbelievers. In any church there are those who truly know Christ and those who are going through the motions. Wearing the label “Christian” does not guarantee a change of heart. It is possible to hear the Word, and even agree with its truth, without taking it to heart. It is possible to attend church, serve in a ministry, and call yourself a Christian—and still be unsaved (Matthew 7:21-23). As the prophet said, “These people come near to me with their mouth and honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me” (Isaiah 29:13; cf. Mark 7:6).

God warns the pretender who sits in the pew and hears the gospel Sunday after Sunday that he is playing with fire. Eventually, a pretender will apostatize—he will “fall away” from the faith he once professed—if he does not repent. Like the tares among the wheat, his true nature will be manifest.

The passages warning against apostasy serve two primary purposes. First, they exhort everyone to be sure of their salvation. One’s eternal destiny is not a trifling matter. Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians 13:5 to examine ourselves to see whether we are “in the faith.”

One test of true faith is love for others (1 John 4:7-8). Another is good works. Anyone can claim to be a Christian, but those who are truly saved will bear fruit. A true Christian will show, through words, actions, and doctrine, that he follows the Lord. Christians bear fruit in varying degrees based on their level of obedience and their spiritual gifts, but all Christians bear fruit as the Spirit produces it in them (Galatians 5:22-23). Just as true followers of Jesus Christ will be able to see evidence of their salvation (see 1 John 4:13), apostates will eventually be made known by their fruit (Matthew 7:16-20) or lack thereof (John 15:2).

The second purpose for the Bible’s warnings against apostasy is to equip the church to identify apostates. They can be known by their rejection of Christ, acceptance of heresy, and carnal nature (2 Peter 2:1-3).

The biblical warnings against apostasy, therefore, are warnings to those who are under the umbrella of “faith” without ever having truly exercised faith. Scriptures such as Hebrews 6:4-6 and Hebrews 10:26-29 are warnings to “pretend” believers that they need to examine themselves before it’s too late. If they are considering apostatizing, they are not truly saved. Matthew 7:22-23 indicates that “pretend believers” whom the Lord rejects on judgment day are rejected not because they “lost faith,” but because the Lord never knew them.

They never had a relationship with Him.

There are many people who love religion for religion’s sake and are willing to identify themselves with Jesus and the church. Who wouldn’t want eternal life and blessing? However, Jesus warns us to “count the cost” of discipleship (Luke 9:23-26; 14:25-33). True believers have counted the cost and made the commitment; apostates fail to do so. Apostates had a profession of faith at one time, but not the possession of faith. Their mouths spoke something other than what their hearts believed. Apostasy is not loss of salvation, but evidence of past pretension.

Question: Can a Christian “give back” salvation?

Answer: The short answer to this question is no, a true Christian cannot “give back” salvation. Oddly enough, some who agree that a Christian cannot lose his salvation still believe that salvation can be given back to God. Some who hold this viewpoint will read Romans 8:38-39 and say that, while nothing outside of us can separate us from God, we ourselves can choose, in our free will, to separate ourselves from God. This is not only unbiblical, but also defies logic.

To understand why it is impossible for us to give back our salvation, we must grasp three things: the nature of God, the nature of man, and the nature of salvation itself. God is, by nature, a Savior. Thirteen times in the Psalms alone, God is referred to as the Savior of man. God alone is our Savior; no one else can save us, and we cannot save ourselves. “I, even I, am the LORD, and apart from me there is no savior” (Isaiah 43:11). Nowhere in Scripture is God ever portrayed as a Savior who depends on those He saves to effect salvation. John 1:13 makes it clear that those who belong to God are not born again by their own will but by God’s will. God saves by His will to save and His power to save. His will is never thwarted, and His power is unlimited (Daniel 4:35).

God’s plan of salvation was accomplished by Jesus Christ, God incarnate, who came to earth to “seek and to save what was lost” (Luke 19:10). Jesus made it clear that we did not choose Him, but that He chose us and appointed us to “go and bear fruit” (John 15:16). Salvation is a gift from God through faith in Christ, given to those whom He has chosen to receive it. Once salvation is received, it is sealed by the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 1:11-14). We are neither authorized to break or capable of breaking the Holy Spirit’s seal on what God has accomplished in saving us through Christ.

A Christian is one who has been redeemed from sin and placed on the path to heaven. He is a new creation, and his heart has been turned toward God. His old nature is gone, passed away. His new nature would no more desire to give back

his salvation and return to his old self than a heart transplant recipient would want to give back his new heart in exchange for his old, diseased heart. The concept of a Christian giving back his salvation is unscriptural and unthinkable.

Question: If you doubt your salvation, does that mean you are not truly saved?

Answer: Everyone has occasional doubts. Whether or not you have doubts is not what determines your Christianity. Even when a believer is faithless, God is faithful (2 Timothy 2:13). God wants us to be confident of our salvation (1 John 5:13). God promises that everyone who believes in Jesus Christ will be saved (John 3:16; Romans 10:9-10). We have all sinned and fall short of God’s glory (Romans 3:23). As a result, we deserve death and an eternity apart from God (Romans 6:23). But God loved us enough to send His Son to die in our place, taking the punishment we deserve (Romans 5:8). As a result, all those who believe are saved and eternally secure.

Sometimes doubting is a good thing. Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians 13:5, ’’Examine yourselves to see whether you are in the faith.” We are to test ourselves to be sure that Jesus is our Savior and the Holy Spirit is in us. If He is, we can in no way lose the salvation Christ has obtained for us (Romans 8:38- 39). If He is not, then perhaps the Holy Spirit is convicting us of sin and prompting us to repent and be reconciled to God through Christ. The assurance of our salvation comes from the knowledge that, once we are in Christ, we are eternally secure. But genuine saving faith is evidenced by its works (James 2:14-26) and the fruit of the Spirit within us (Galatians 5:22-23). A lack of this evidence can sometimes be the cause of doubt.

Have you placed your faith in Christ? If the answer is yes, then throw away your doubts and trust God. If you know Jesus as your Savior, you are saved without a doubt! If the answer is no, then believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and you will, without a doubt, be saved.

Links to Other Q and A on Salvation

Top Questions About the Plan of Salvation with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Jesus and Salvation with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Who Can Be Saved with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Assurance of Salvation with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Salvation and Works with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Salvation Terminology with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Life After Salvation with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Election and Predestination with Biblical Answers

Top Questions About Salvation and the Old Testament with Biblical Answers

Top Miscellaneous Questions About Salvation with Biblical Answers

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